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#WorldTBDay Global rise of multidrug resistant tuberculosis threatens to derail decades of progress
New antibiotics are becoming available for the first time but without accurate diagnostics, clear treatment guidelines, and improved control efforts, their effectiveness could be rapidly lost.
Medicine and science in harmony after seven years
Matthew Amoni always wanted to be a doctor, but he also fell in love with science at school. So he studied both, completing an MBChB, BSc (Med) (Hons) and an MSc in physiology as part of UCT’s Clinical Scholars Programme.
UCT researchers discover heart-attack gene
Researchers from UCT's Hatter Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa (HICRA), through global collaboration, have identified a new gene that is a major cause of sudden death among young people and athletes.
Sugar tax is not pie in the sky
The South African sugar tax is based on solid science and is a step in the right direction, say UCT health sciences researchers.
HIV centre lands huge Zimele Project
The Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation has been chosen to implement the Zimele Project, a health and social intervention programme for youth in the Western Cape

News

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Professor Bongani Mayosi spoke to The Conversation about the significance of the discovery of a gene that’s responsible for an inherited form of heart muscle disease.

Publication Date:
Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 09:30

The emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis has resulted in scientists taking a more aggressive and urgent approach to research into the development of the disease.

Publication Date:
Friday, March 24, 2017 - 14:45

UCT has partnered with BGM Pharma and the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation to develop GluCAB, a breakthrough in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Publication Date:
Friday, March 17, 2017 - 09:45

Medical researchers, through a global collaboration, have identified a new gene that is a major cause of sudden death among young people and among athletes. The gene, called CDH2, causes Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricle Cardiomyopathy (ARVC), a genetic disorder that predisposes young people to cardiac arrest.

Publication Date:
Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:30

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