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Speech-language Pathology

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Congratulations to the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative (SATVI),  who received the Vice-Chancellor’s Social Responsiveness Award for 2018 at the Health Sciences graduation ceremony on Saturday 13 April 2019.

View the Dean's presentation from the Faculty Assembly here

Dean Williamson welcoming the Minister of Health, Dr. P Aaron Motsoaledi, to the Steve Lawn Annual Memorial Lecture on campus. View the full talk here

 

 

    

News

Friday, 26 April 2019
UCT first university to adopt global ethics code

The University of Cape Town (UCT) Senate has adopted the Global Code of Conduct for Research in Resource-Poor Settings (GCC). The code, which is directed at all research disciplines from bioscience to zoology, emphasises close collaboration between partners in the global north and south through all stages of research. It was developed over the past four years by TRUST, a collaborative EU-funded project, with UCT as a key partner.

Publication Date:
Thu, 18 Apr 2019 - 11:45
Gary Maartens awarded NRF A-rating

Professor Gary Maartens is both head of clinical pharmacology at the University of Cape Town (UCT) and a chief specialist physician at Groote Schuur Hospital. Earlier this year, South Africa’s National Research Foundation (NRF) recognised his contribution to the field by awarding him an A rating.

Publication Date:
Thu, 18 Apr 2019 - 10:00
SATVI wins Social Responsiveness Award

Established in 2001, the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative (SATVI) was presented with the University of Cape Town’s (UCT) 2018 Social Responsiveness Award at the Faculty of Health Sciences graduation ceremony on Saturday, 13 April.

Publication Date:
Tue, 16 Apr 2019 - 13:00
Common contraceptive could raise TB risk

A breakthrough study conducted by Professor Keertan Dheda and Dr Michele Tomasicchio, at the University of Cape Town’s (UCT) Centre for Lung Infection and Immunity, has revealed that one of South Africa’s most commonly-used injectable contraceptives could increase women’s chances of contracting tuberculosis (TB).

Publication Date:
Mon, 15 Apr 2019 - 11:00

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